When to take various contraceptive pills

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When to Take Various Contraceptive Pills

Too-Yourhealth

Contraceptive pills are a safe and effective way to prevent pregnancy. They work by preventing ovulation, the release of an egg from the ovary. Contraceptive pills come in two main types: combined oral contraceptives (COCs) and progestin-only pills (POPs).

COCs contain both estrogen and progestin, while POPs contain only progestin. COCs are more effective than POPs, but they can also cause more side effects.

When to Take COCs

COCs are taken once a day, at the same time each day. It is important to take COCs exactly as directed, as missing even one pill can reduce their effectiveness.

The first pill in a pack of COCs is usually taken on the first day of your period. If you start taking COCs on another day of your cycle, you will need to use a backup method of contraception, such as condoms, for the first 7 days.

You will continue to take one pill each day for 21 days. Then, you will take a break from taking pills for 7 days. During this break, you may experience withdrawal bleeding, which is similar to a period.

After the 7-day break, you will start a new pack of COCs.

When to Take POPs

POPs are taken once a day, at the same time each day. It is important to take POPs exactly as directed, as missing even one pill can reduce their effectiveness.

You can start taking POPs on any day of your cycle. However, if you start taking POPs on day 1-5 of your cycle, you will be protected from pregnancy immediately. If you start taking POPs on any other day of your cycle, you will need to use a backup method of contraception, such as condoms, for the first 7 days.

You will continue to take one pill each day, without taking any breaks.

Side Effects of Contraceptive Pills

Contraceptive pills can cause a variety of side effects, including:

Nausea

Vomiting

Diarrhea

Breast tenderness

Mood swings

Acne

Weight gain

Irregular bleeding

Most side effects are mild and go away within a few months. However, if you experience any severe side effects, you should see your doctor.

Contraindications to Contraceptive Pills

Contraceptive pills are not right for everyone. You should not take contraceptive pills if you have:

A history of blood clots

A history of stroke or heart attack

A history of liver disease

A history of breast cancer

A history of uncontrolled high blood pressure

A history of migraines with aura

A history of sickle cell anemia

A history of lupus

Talk to Your Doctor

If you are considering using contraceptive pills, talk to your doctor. Your doctor can help you decide if contraceptive pills are right for you and can help you choose the right type of pill for you.

The above is all the content that the editor wants to share with you. I sincerely hope that these contents can bring some help to your life and health, and I also wish that your life will be happier and happier.

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