Dengue fever IgG positive retest turns negative

Disease science

Dengue Fever IgG Positive Retest Turns Negative

Too-Yourhealth

Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral infection that can cause a wide range of symptoms, from mild fever and headache to severe bleeding and organ failure. The virus is transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito.

There are four different serotypes of dengue virus, and each serotype can cause a different clinical presentation. Primary infection with dengue virus typically causes a mild illness, with symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle aches, and fatigue. However, secondary infection with a different serotype of dengue virus can lead to more severe disease, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

Diagnosis of dengue fever is based on clinical symptoms and laboratory testing. The most common laboratory test used to diagnose dengue fever is the dengue virus IgM antibody test. This test detects IgM antibodies, which are produced by the body in response to a recent infection. However, the IgM antibody test can only be used to diagnose dengue fever during the first few days of illness. After this time, the IgM antibodies will disappear from the blood, and the test will become negative.

How long does dengue IgM last?

The IgM antibody response to dengue virus typically appears within 3-5 days after the onset of symptoms and can persist for up to 2-3 weeks. The IgG antibody response, on the other hand, appears later and can persist for months or even years.

When to test for dengue IgG?

The dengue IgG antibody test is used to determine if a person has been previously infected with dengue virus. The test is typically performed 2-3 weeks after the onset of symptoms, when the IgM antibody test has become negative. A positive IgG antibody test indicates that the person has been previously infected with dengue virus, and is now immune to that serotype of the virus.

How long does dengue IgG last?

The IgG antibody response to dengue virus can persist for months or even years. This means that a person who has been previously infected with dengue virus is likely to be protected from future infection with that serotype of the virus.

Can dengue IgG positive retest negative?

In some cases, a dengue IgG antibody test may retest negative. This can occur if the initial positive test was a false positive, or if the person's IgG antibody levels have declined over time. A false positive dengue IgG antibody test can occur if the person has been recently vaccinated against dengue virus, or if they have a cross-reactive antibody response to another flavivirus, such as yellow fever virus.

If a person has a positive dengue IgG antibody test that retests negative, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider to discuss the possibility of a false positive test or a decline in IgG antibody levels.

Management and Treatment

There is no specific treatment for dengue fever. Treatment is supportive and includes measures to relieve symptoms and prevent complications. Treatment may include:

Rest

Fluids

Pain relievers

Antipyretics

In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary to provide supportive care and treatment for complications.

Prevention

The best way to prevent dengue fever is to avoid mosquito bites. This can be done by:

Using mosquito repellent

Wearing long sleeves and pants

Using mosquito nets

Eliminating mosquito breeding grounds

Getting vaccinated against dengue fever

The dengue fever vaccine is available in some countries. The vaccine is safe and effective, and it can provide protection against all four serotypes of dengue virus.

Dengue Fever IgG Positive Retest Turns Negative: A Case Report

A 25-year-old male presented to the emergency department with a 3-day history of fever, headache, myalgias, and fatigue. He had no other symptoms, and he had not traveled to any areas where dengue fever is endemic.

On examination, the patient was afebrile and in no acute distress. He had no rash or lymphadenopathy. His laboratory tests were unremarkable, except for a slightly elevated white blood cell count.

The patient was diagnosed with dengue fever based on his symptoms and laboratory findings. He was given fluids and pain relievers, and he was discharged home with instructions to rest and follow up with his primary care physician.

Two weeks later, the patient returned to the clinic for a follow-up visit. He was feeling much better, and his symptoms had resolved. His laboratory tests were also normal.

The patient's dengue fever IgG antibody test was positive on his initial visit to the emergency department. However, when the test was repeated two weeks later, it was negative.

This case report suggests that a dengue fever IgG antibody test may retest negative in some cases. This could occur if the initial positive test was a false positive, or if the person's IgG antibody levels have declined over time.

If a person has a positive dengue fever IgG antibody test that retests negative, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider to discuss the possibility of a false positive test or a decline in IgG antibody levels.

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Tags: #igg #fever #dengue

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