What to do if you have left ureteral stones

Disease science

What to Do if You Have Left Ureteral Stones

Too-Yourhealth

Ureteral stones are hard deposits of minerals and salts that form in the ureters, the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder. Left ureteral stones can cause pain, nausea, vomiting, and fever. If you think you may have a left ureteral stone, it is important to see a doctor right away.

Symptoms of Left Ureteral Stones

The most common symptom of a left ureteral stone is pain. The pain is typically felt in the lower back, side, or abdomen. It may come and go, or it may be constant. Other symptoms of left ureteral stones include:

Nausea

Vomiting

Fever

Chills

Painful urination

Frequent urination

Urgent urination

Cloudy or bloody urine

Causes of Left Ureteral Stones

Left ureteral stones are most commonly caused by dehydration. When you are dehydrated, the urine becomes concentrated and the minerals in the urine can crystallize and form stones. Other causes of left ureteral stones include:

High levels of calcium in the urine

High levels of oxalate in the urine

Low levels of citrate in the urine

Kidney disease

Diabetes

Obesity

Family history of kidney stones

Diagnosis of Left Ureteral Stones

Your doctor will diagnose a left ureteral stone based on your symptoms and a physical examination. Your doctor may also order one or more of the following tests:

Urinalysis

Blood test

X-ray

CT scan

Ultrasound

Treatment of Left Ureteral Stones

The treatment for a left ureteral stone depends on the size and location of the stone. Small stones may pass on their own with plenty of fluids. Larger stones may need to be treated with medication or surgery.

Medication

There are a number of medications that can be used to treat left ureteral stones. These medications include:

Alpha-blockers: Alpha-blockers relax the muscles in the ureters, which can help the stone pass more easily.

Calcium channel blockers: Calcium channel blockers also relax the muscles in the ureters.

Diuretics: Diuretics increase the flow of urine, which can help the stone pass more easily.

Surgery

Surgery is sometimes necessary to treat left ureteral stones that are too large to pass on their own or that are causing complications. Surgery can be performed in a number of ways, including:

Ureteroscopy: Ureteroscopy involves inserting a small camera into the ureter to visualize the stone. The stone can then be removed using a laser or other tool.

Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL): PCNL involves making a small incision in the back and inserting a tube into the kidney. The stone can then be removed using a laser or other tool.

Open surgery: Open surgery involves making a larger incision in the abdomen or back to access the ureter. The stone can then be removed directly.

Prevention of Left Ureteral Stones

There are a number of things you can do to prevent left ureteral stones, including:

Drink plenty of fluids, especially water.

Eat a healthy diet that is low in sodium and oxalate.

Exercise regularly.

Maintain a healthy weight.

Avoid smoking.

Limit your intake of alcohol.

Take medication to prevent stones if you have a history of kidney stones.

Outlook for Left Ureteral Stones

The outlook for left ureteral stones is generally good. Most stones will pass on their own with plenty of fluids. However, some stones may need to be treated with medication or surgery. If you have a left ureteral stone, it is important to see a doctor right away to get the proper treatment.

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